Daily Thoughts, October 14, 2005
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Old Days

With age, the frequency of remembering the “old” days proportionally increases.  It’s as if we long for what we think was, but was it really?  We find ourselves remembering great old cars, fantastic television programs, and gentler times.  The memories work as long as one keeps them in the realm of words, conversations, and good friends.  If you move into the realm of physically driving the old cars, sitting through more than one program from times past, or ruthlessly examining the statistics the picture is quite different.
 
The cars of the 1950’s and 1960’s were not always easy to drive.  What we assume will be standard equipment – power steering, power brakes, air-conditioning, and music – were optional at best!  Flat tires were a common sight.  So were cars sitting on the side of the road due to overheating or mechanical-failure.  Most carried toolkits with them and knew how to use them!  The same analysis follows with the golden age of television.  Granted there were one or two programs across the decade which stood the test of time, however there was a lot of junk.  Additionally audiences lived with poor quality reception, mindless plots, and game and news shows that were more often show than substance. 
 
As one looks to the quality of life part of our past one finds the relationship challenges of today were present in equal measure.  Our role within the broader community has always been at conflict with our “self”.  Jealousy, revenge, and fear have been part of our lives for decades, centuries really.  Things may have appeared more brutal with the critic commenting “If God-of-the-Angel-Armies hadn't left us a few survivors, we'd be as desolate as Sodom, doomed just like Gomorrah,” (Isaiah 1.9) yet I am not so sure we are really any different today.  We isolate, libel, and tear at the fabric of other’s self esteem, all in an effort to make sure we survive.
 
Yesterday is still available for learning and remembering.  Both are good things.  The question is now – what will we do with what we have?

October 13, 2005
October 15, 2005